Radio City Class Of 77

radio1Radio Citys “Class of ’77” is my favorite album of 2009!”>>> Frank Secich/Blue Ash/Deadbeat Poets  The previously unreleased full album from this amazing New York band! Hunkered in the studio in the late ’70s, these guys made a beautiful testament to the power of pop! Before the skinny ties, these guys followed the path laid out by BIG STAR, THE RASPBERRIES, BLUE ASH and BADFINGER, mixed with their own raw sound, to dizzying results! A mandatory purchase for powerpop fans everywhere-Soundflat-Germany

In the 70s, a handful of bands would not give in to the pressures of the music industry and produced music from their hearts that would last forever because of its honesty and integrity. Given the climate of the industry in those years, this was, in hindsight, heroic action. Radio City tops this list and due credit may finally be given to them. They picked up where bands like The Beatles and Badfinger left off; gave us back our innocence in their fun, imaginative music that held us to what we thought we could be and would be in our minds and in our hearts. Where other bands crumbled to industry pressure, Radio City stayed true to their beliefs and gave us melodies and song crafting that makes one want to go out to buy a guitar and learn how to play. Radio City should have made it big but instead are now legendary. We need them now more than ever >>> Danny Shonerd, The Boys(USA)
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After I heard The Wigs earlier this year, I thought we’d never see another lost treasure from the early years of 1970’s power pop. Long Island, NY native Gary Feldman formed Radio City in 1977, taking a love of The Raspberries, Todd Rundgren and The Byrds with him in the studio. In fact, the band’s big sin was being “too pop” in a fashionably punked-out New York music scene at the time. It’s another case of a group breaking up before it’s full studio release, but Gary revived and remastered the album, and it finally sees the light of day. Opening with true gems like “Don’t Mistake Love” and “Little Runaway” this is a perfect example of the period. Both these singles would have been big hits if they were released back then. Starting with “She’s A Heartbreaker” you can hear a bit of early punk influences poking through. The playing is exceptional, and energy on tracks like “Tomorrow” and “Play It Like A Man” compares well with Elvis Costello or The Rubinoos, full of Rickenbacker riffs and strong drumming. The last 4 tracks have alternate takes and some live performances. For fans of Buddy Love,  The Wigs, Doug Derek & The Hoax and The Toms it’s a no-brainer. This is another band that deserves credit for helping bridge the link from Badfinger and The Raspberries to  The La’s and The Smithereens.

 

  

Not Lame Recordings   April 2009

RADIO CITY – Class Of `77


Man. I just am so in love with the fact that there are so many obscure projects from the late 70s that are finding their way out over the last few years. Skinny-tie power pop bands from this era that struggled, worked hard, toughed it out and came so close to getting label deals but through the vagaries of the process to get the much-desired contract, it never happened. What was left, in the ashes of youthful hopes and ambitions are tapes, cassettes of their efforts. The latest to be lovingly unearthed is Radio City, a New York City band of super talented guys who left super cool batch of tunes that will leave many of us power popping geeks smiling, happy and geeked. Bless us, the chosen, enlightened few who `got` this music then – and do now.
So if you can`t get enough of 70s power pop bands that were writing songs under the influence of the Beatles, Big Star and Blue Ash and you lament the fact that there`s just not as many of these records as there should have been. Enter Radio City into your life. Recorded in NY between 1977 and 1980 these `lost` Radio City recordings have been carried along until not merely in the rumors of power pop enthusiasts and collectors. The wait is over as, fortunately, there remains a LPs worth of songs such as Don`t Mistake Love and Little Runaway that should move even the most jaded of hearts with their blend of pop melancholy lyric and Rickenbacker jangle. The awesome PowerPopAholic blog raved: “8 out of 10. the band`s big sin was being “too pop” in a fashionably punked-out New York music scene at the time. It`s another case of a group breaking up before it`s full studio release, but Gary revived and remastered the album, and it finally sees the light of day. Opening with true gems like “Don`t Mistake Love” and “Little Runaway” this is a perfect example of the period. Both these singles would have been big hits if they were released back then. Starting with “She`s A Heartbreaker” you can hear a bit of early punk influences poking through. The playing is exceptional, and energy on tracks like “Tomorrow” and “Play It Like A Man” compares well with Elvis Costello or The Rubinoos, full of Rickenbacker riffs and strong drumming. The last 4 tracks have alternate takes and some live performances. For fans of Buddy Love, The Wigs, Doug Derek & The Hoax and The Toms it`s a no-brainer.” “The previously unreleased full album from this amazing New York band! Hunkered in the studio in the late `70s, these guys made a beautiful testament to the power of pop! Before the skinny ties, these guys followed the path laid out by BIG STAR, THE RASPBERRIES, BLUE ASH and BADFINGER, mixed with their own raw sound, to dizzying results! A mandatory purchase for powerpop fans everywhere!” – SoundFlat “In the 70s, a handful of bands would not give in to the pressures of the music industry and produced music from their hearts that would last forever because of its honesty and integrity. Given the climate of the industry in those years, this was, in hindsight, heroic action. Radio City tops this list and due credit may finally be given to them. They picked up where bands like The Beatles and Badfinger left off; gave us back our innocence in their fun, imaginative music that held us to what we thought we could be and would be in our minds and in our hearts. Where other bands crumbled to industry pressure, Radio City stayed true to their beliefs and gave us melodies and song crafting that makes one want to go out to buy a guitar and learn how to play. Radio City should have made it big but instead are now legendary. We need them now more than ever”. Danny Shonerd, The Boys. Extremely Highly Recommended, for sure!

 

Kool Kat review
WOW!!! We are constantly amazed when finds from “back in the day” of early power pop-dom like this seemingly come out of nowhere! One of the most recent ones were the CDs we released by Doug Derek & The Hoax and The Agents! And this one by Radio City fits quite nicely next to both The Agents’ and Doug Derek’s discs! So, we just have to ask – “Who the hell were Radio City?” If you can’t get enough of 70’s power pop bands that were writing songs under the influence of the Beatles, Big Star, 20/20, BOMP-era indie pop, Blue Ash and you lament the fact that there’s just not as many of these records as there should have been, then you need this!!! Recorded in New York between 1977 and 1980 these ‘lost’ recordings (13 tracks, live + studio) have been carried along until not merely in the rumors of power pop enthusiasts and collectors. The wait is over as, fortunately, there remained an LP’s worth of songs such as “Don’t Mistake Love” and “Little Runaway” that should move even the most jaded of hearts with their blend of pop melancholy lyric and Rickenbacker jangle. “This is my favorite album of 200 9!” – Frank Secich/Blue Ash “An incredible power pop gem. If these songs don’t stay in your head all day… then check your pulse. Reminiscent of The Raspberries, the best of the bubblegum genre and some early Beatles. How did these guys ‘miss’?” “In the 70’s, a handful of bands would not give in to the pressures of the music industry and produced music from their hearts that would last forever because of its honesty and integrity. Given the climate of the industry in those years, this was, in hindsight, heroic action. Radio City tops this list and due credit may finally be given to them. These guys picked up where bands like The Beatles and Badfinger left off and gave us melodies and song crafting that makes one want to go out to buy a guitar and learn how to play. They should have made it big but instead are now legendary. We need them now more than ever!” – Danny Shonerd/The Boys (USA) A very welcome release indeed! GREAT T!!!!

Jordan Oaks Review in St. Lewis Magazine
Radio Heartbeat wears its vinyl on its sleeve. The label has not only rescued abandoned pop and punk music but put it back where it belongs: in the grooves.

A band called Radio City made some amazing recordings in the late ‘70s – but somehow they were overlooked; and, in the great tradition of other unsung heroes, broke up before having a chance to make an impression. Radio Heartbeat has assembled the group’s recordings on Radio City, the band’s self-titled second chance. I’ve heard enough jangly pop to keep me in arpeggios for a lifetime. Once you get past Cheap Trick and a few other seminal combos, most power-pop is played strictly on the B-string. There’s nothing wrong with that; but it’s also the reason pop hasn’t properly changed the world. Thankfully, Radio City is a nice surprise. If you deconstruct their sound – the pretty guitars, the sweet harmonies, the edgy, love-obsessed lyrics – you have the raw ingredients for a pleasant but mediocre pop combo. But it’s the way the band combines those ingredients that makes them beat to a different drum. There’s a bonus dose of energy, some extra care in the vocal department, and the would-be lyrical clichés are given a fresh coat of paint. Radio City may not change your world – but it will make it spin at a heavenly 33 and 1/3. A real find.

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